Discussion of the four noble truths

Died As it is described in the Pali Canon, Buddha spoke to his companions after he realized enlightenment and he told them that he had already realized cessation of dukkha, or suffering and unsatisfactoriness. This was as a young man, aged By this he meant cessation of dukkha in all its forms, not just the cessation of the dukkha of birth.

Discussion of the four noble truths

These teachings are known to contain the essence of the Buddhist path, regardless of the tradition one follows. Even if we consider ourselves happy for a while, this happiness is transitory by nature.

This mean that at best, we can only find temporary happiness and pleasure in life. Suffering or unsatisfactoriness can be distinguished in three types: Even death is not a solution in Buddhist philosophy, as we will simply find ourselves being reborn in a different body, which will also experience problems.

To illustrate this with the words of the 7th Dalai Lama from 'Songs of spiritual change' translated by Glenn Mullin: This image fits with the song Of the myriads of foolish living beings Who seek happiness in superficial pleasures; In countless ways they try, Yet I have never seen them satisfied.

Interestingly enough, some people actually translate it as "stress". It is a key term and it should be thoroughly understood. The Pali word is dukkha, and it does not just mean the agony of the body. It means that deep subtle sense of unsatisfactoriness which is a part of every mind moment and which results directly from the mental treadmill.

The essence of life is suffering, said the Buddha. At first glance this seems exceedingly morbid and pessimistic. It even seems untrue.

After all, there are plenty of times when we are happy. No, there are not. It just seems that way. Take any moment when you feel really fulfilled and examine it closely. Down under the joy, you will find that subtle, all-pervasive undercurrent of tension, that no matter how great this moment is, it is going to end.

No matter how much you just gained, you are either going to lose some of it or spend the rest of your days guarding what you have got and scheming how to get more.

And in the end, you are going to die. In the end, you lose everything. It is all transitory. According to Buddhism, our main mental problems or root delusions are: Because of these delusions, we engage in actions that cause problems to ourselves and others.

With every negative action karma we do, we create a potential for negative experiences. See also the page on karma. How can attachment bring us suffering? We just have to think of chocolate and there is the temptation of eating more than is good for us. Or as example, my favourite story: One takes a coconut and makes a hole in it, just large enough that a monkey can squeeze its hand in.

Next, tie the coconut down, and put a sweet inside.

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What happens next is pure attachment. The monkey smells the sweet, puts his hand into the coconut, grabs the sweet and The last thing a monkey would consider is to let go of the sweet, so it is literally tied down by its own attachment.

Often they only let go when they fall asleep or become unconscious because of exhaustion. Ultimately, the Buddha explains that our attachment to life keeps us in cyclic existence or samsara, which does not bring us continuous happiness.

How can anger bring us suffering?Discussion Question about the four noble truths and buddhism in general. Title. Author. Category Question about the four noble truths and buddhism in general.

Supertramp. January edited January in Buddhism Basics. Hello, I'm new here. The Four Noble Truths, as taught by the Buddha, all have to deal with the concept of human suffering. The first truth is called Dukkha, or the truth. This lesson plan provides you with a quiz, extension, activity, and discussion questions and topics that will help students identify and understand the Four Noble Truths.

Discussion of the four noble truths of Buddhism Essay - Q2. Outline and discuss the four noble truths: is the Buddhist view of existence optimistic or pessimistic. The question of the Buddhist view of existence being optimistic or pessimistic is one which is many have an opinion on.

It could be said that the four noble truths provide the views. The Four Noble Truths are sometimes compared to a doctor diagnosing and treating an illness. The First Truth is the diagnosis of a problem, the Second Truth is the cause of the illness, and the Third is the truth that there is a cure (and the Fourth is the prescription).

Essay on Discussion of the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism.

Discussion of the four noble truths

Q2. Outline and discuss the four noble truths: is the Buddhist view of existence optimistic or pessimistic? The question of the Buddhist view of existence being optimistic or pessimistic is one which is many have an opinion on.

The Four Noble Truths: An Overview — Study Buddhism